Low FODMAP Red Wine Chicken or Steak Marinade Recipe

Store-bought marinades are very convenient, however, they all contain garlic and/or onion, which are a big issue when on the low FODMAP diet. Don’t even bother trying to find one… I have searched high and low and have found nothing. However, it’s very, very easy to make your own. Had I known this years ago, I could have saved a lot of money… not to mention a lot of pain!

Low FODMAP Red Wine Marinade

Low FODMAP Red Wine Chicken or Steak Marinade Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil (Garlic Infused Olive Oil adds a great flavor)
  • 2 Tablespoons Red Wine Vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons Fresh Chives, Diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon Gluten Free Asafoetida Powder (Garlic & Onion Replacement)
  • 1/4 teaspoon Dried Parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoon Dried Paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon Dried Basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon Sugar (optional – I don’t use it because I like things a little tart.)

Directions:

  1. Put all ingredients into a small tupperware container.
  2. Close tupperware and shake vigorously.
  3. In a Ziploc bag, add raw meat of your choice and add marinade.
  4. Ensure marinade completely cover raw meat.
  5. Remove excess air and seal tightly
  6. Chill for 4-5 hours.
  7. Cook meat as you wish. On a grill is perfect for summer!
  8. Discard any unused portion.

Makes enough for 2 large chicken breasts or 2 large steaks.

Notes:

  • Please feel free to modify as you wish, I like things a little spicy and tart, so if this is not your tastes, please scale back on the spices.
  • Crushed Red Pepper Flakes can be added to give it a little more spice.

Like this recipe? Let me know what you think and explore more low FODMAP recipes.

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Low FODMAP Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

The first time I caught a cold while on the low FODMAP diet, I was very unprepared. Chicken noodle soup is a great remedy for a sore throat, runny nose and fever, but almost all canned soups contain wheat, garlic or onion, so I was at a loss. I had some gluten free broth that I had prepared and froze months ago, but I knew how loaded with garlic, onion and celery it was, which would make me feel worse. As soon as I felt better, I perfected my low FODMAP chicken broth and chicken soup recipes, so I would be better prepared the next time I was under the weather.

Low FODMAP Chicken Noodle Soup

Low FODMAP Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 1 2-3 Cup Serving of Low FODMAP Chicken Broth
  • 2-3 Cups Water (Fill the Container used for the Broth)
  • 1 Cup Cooked, Chopped Chicken Breast
  • 2-4 oz Uncooked Gluten Free Pasta/Noodles (I use Trader Joe’s Organic Brown Rice Pasta Fusilli)
  • Salt & Pepper to Taste

Directions:

  1. Add Low FODMAP Chicken Broth and Water into a pot.
  2. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently.
  3. Add Uncooked Gluten Free Pasta and Chicken to pot.
  4. Reduce heat and simmer for about 10-12 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add Salt & Pepper to taste if desired.
  6. Once pasta is cooked to preference, remove from heat.
  7. Serve immediately.
  8. Makes about 4 servings.

Notes:

  • The 2-4 oz of Gluten Free Pasta can be substituted with white or brown rice.
  • You can refrigerate any unused portion and reheat in the microwave later.

Like this recipe? Let me know what you think and explore more low FODMAP recipes.

Low FODMAP Chicken Broth Recipe

Being gluten free for years, I perfected my homemade chicken soup recipe since most canned soups contain gluten. When I embarked on the low FODMAP diet, I was very worried that I wouldn’t be able to modify this recipe to work…. until I found Progresso Tuscany Chicken BrothLow FODMAP Products, which doesn’t contain garlic or onion. I haven’t yet found this in stores, so I buy it from Amazon. This allows me to make broth without the hassle of a using whole chicken.

I make a large batch of my low FODMAP chicken broth and freeze it for later use in my delicious chicken noodle soup. I found out very early that rice noodles, rice and/or chicken do not freeze and reheat well within the broth, so I add them when I am ready to eat them instead. This new version of my low FODMAP chicken broth doesn’t even make me miss my old version loaded with garlic, onion and celery!

Low FODMAP Chicken Broth

Low FODMAP Chicken Broth Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 3  32oz Containers of Progresso Tuscany Chicken BrothLow FODMAP Products
  • 1 Bunch of Raw Carrots, Diced (8-10 Large Carrots)
  • 1 Bunch of Green Onions, Diced (Green Part Only)
  • 1/4 Cup Fresh Chives, Diced
  • 3 Tablespoons Garlic Infused Olive Oil
  • 3 teaspoons Kosher Salt
  • 2 teaspoons Pepper
  • 2 teaspoons Gluten Free Asafoetida Powder (Garlic & Onion Replacement)
  • 2 teaspoons Dried Parsley
  • 2 teaspoons Dried Rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon Dried Basil
  • 1 teaspoon Dried Oregano

Directions:

  • Add all ingredients into a large stock pot.
  • Cover, and bring mixture to a boil, stirring frequently.
  • Reduce heat, cover and simmer for about 30-35 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Once carrots have softened, remove from heat and allow broth to cool.
  • Divide into 2-3 Cup-sized Tupperware containers and place in freezer. Makes about 4-5 portions.
  • If planning to serve as soup immediately, follow the Low FODMAP Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe.

Notes:

  • This chicken broth is a bit zesty, so if you like things a bit more mild, limit the spices used.
  • This chicken broth is very concentrated, so prior to eating, it should be diluted with water as described in the Low FODMAP Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe.

Like this recipe? Let me know what you think and explore more low FODMAP recipes.

Reintroducing FODMAPs Back into your Diet

The low FODMAP diet is not a life-long diet that you must adhere to… thank goodness! It’s a diet that is designed to identify the causes of your IBS symptoms and give the knowledge to design your future diet. However, the low FODMAP diet is always a safe eating plan to return to when you experience IBS symptoms.

So, after you’ve done the FODMAP eliminate phase for 6-8 weeks or so, now what?

Well, first off – are you feeling better? If you’re not after 6-8 weeks, re-examine your food  intake and see if you may have slipped up somewhere. It may be a different food for you that triggers your symptoms. For example, my body does not tolerate citrus fruits very well, even though most of them are on the “safe” FODMAP food list. The low FODMAP diet is not a gluten free diet, so maybe gluten is your issue. Do you eat bigger meals? That could be your issue because the diet encourages you to eat in small quantities more frequently throughout the day. Or maybe it’s something as simple as medicine, vitamins, gum, even lip gloss or lipstick that you’re using that could be cause your issues. Check anything that goes near your mouth, including a partner that you kiss.

How to Reintroduce FODMAPs Back into your Diet

If you are feeling much better being FODMAP free, and you’re feeling brave to begin to test FODMAP in your diet, here are the next steps to take:

  • Pick a FODMAP group that you want to test reintroducing into your diet. Choose the one you miss the most. I think most people would start with the fructans because of the wheat and spices. This was not my choice since I had learned to live without garlic and onion with the help of some great replacements, like asafoetida powder. Also, being gluten free for a few years, there were many things, like baked goods, that I no longer craved. However, I missed lactose… very much!
  • Once you’ve decided on the first FODMAP group to reintroduce, select how you want to attempt it. Choose a food that you miss in a small quantity during dinner. Why dinner? Because if it is unsuccessful, you will most likely be able to sleep through most of the symptoms and it won’t ruin your entire day. Since I chose lactose to reintroduce first, it would be silly of me to attempt a 12oz glass of milk for breakfast, since the quantity is very large and I would most likely be very sick by lunchtime. Instead, at dinner one evening, I chose to incorporate one of these convenient Pastariso Instant Gluten Free Mac & Cheese Cups that I missed dearly.
  • After you’ve bravely eaten your FODMAP, monitor your symptoms closely and record all the details. Ensure you keep a diary of what you’ve attempted, when you attempted it and all the details to the symptoms you encountered (if any) for the next 24 hours.
  • If you were unsuccessful in your attempt and your IBS symptoms return, you have clearly indicated one of your triggers (yea!), quantity included. If possible, test a smaller quantity of the FODMAP later in the day and record your symptoms once you are feeling better and your symptoms subside. 
  • If you were successful in your first reintroduction, try something very similar in quantity (from the same FODMAP group) again the next day, and track your symptoms. If this was not successful, refer to the red text above.
  • If the second test was successful – awesome! It looks like you can safely eat that for dinner! Now try to have that item earlier in the day (lunch) and track your symptoms. Again, if you’re not successful, read the red text. It is common to be OK with the same quantity of things at dinner, but not at lunch. This was my case. While I had no symptoms with eating my GF Mac & Cheese at dinner, I got stomach pain and bloating about 5 hours later after attempting it for lunch. I didn’t notice this when I tested for dinner because I was sleeping, and in the morning I felt fine.
  • Successful again? Even better! Every time you succeed and feel no symptoms, repeat and add additional quantities of the same FODMAP group to your meal(s). Eventually you’ll get to a point where you notice that the FODMAP group doesn’t impact you at all or you’ll know your limit that you can consume. This process could take from a few days to a month depending on your success rate.
  • Once you have figured out the safe quantity of the first FODMAP, you can move onto testing the next one of your choice. After about 3 months, you should know what you can tolerate and in what quantities so you can design your diet for the future. For me, I can handle galactans at almost all quantities (welcome back hummus!), and a little bit of lactose, fructose and polyols later in the day. Unfortunately, fructans and I do not get along. Even knowing this, I always eat FODMAP free for breakfast and usually at lunch. This allows me to handle most of my days with ease and go to work like a normal person.

The low FODMAP diet (along with any other treatment) will not “cure” your IBS as some people claim. Unfortunately, there is no cure for IBS and personally I don’t think there ever will be in my lifetime. To find a cure, they would need to find a cause first, while still hasn’t been done. The goal of the low FODMAP diet is to manage your symptoms through your daily diet, which has worked very well for me.

I’d love to hear what FODMAPs have made their way back into your daily diet, so please feel free to leave your comments.

How to Reintroduce FODMAPs into your Diet