Low FODMAP Mexican Taco Dip Recipe

It’s Cinco de Mayo and we’re hosting a Mexican Fiesta Party at our place today. I was looking for an easy Mexican recipe that could be used as a taco dip with tortilla chips or wrapped in a soft tortilla shell. To make it convenient to serve while people come and go, I wanted it to be warming constantly in a crock pot. It’s important that it adhere to the low FODMAP diet since 2 our of guests also struggle with IBS. And, of course, it should be delicious for everyone at the party!

While I didn’t find the ideal taco dip recipe anywhere that met the above guidelines, I decided to create my own. I was a little nervous creating something completely new, but it turned out to be amazing and delicious! I got rave reviews on the Mexican Taco Dip and was asked for my recipe multiple times. So, here it is…

Low FODMAP Mexican Taco Dip Recipe

Low FODMAP Crock Pot Mexican Taco Dip Recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb Ground Turkey (Ground Beef Can be Substituted)
  • 1/2 Cup Olive Oil (Try Garlic Infused Olive Oil for a Great Flavor)
  • 2 14.5 oz Cans of Diced Tomatoes, Drained (Check the ingredients. It’s common for this to contain garlic and/or onion. I use Del Monte Petite Diced Tomatoes.)
  • 1/2 Cup Black Olives
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper
  • 2 Cups Shredded Cheese
  • 1/4 Cup Fresh Cilantro
  • 1/4 Cup Fresh Chives
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon Cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon Paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon Oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dried Parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cayenne Pepper

Directions:

  1. Dice Red Bell Pepper into small pieces.
  2. On stovetop, grill Ground Turkey and diced Red Bell Pepper in Olive Oil in a pan.
  3. Add Salt, Pepper, Cumin, Paprika, Oregano, Parsley and Cayenne Pepper to pan.
  4. While grilling, dice Cilantro, Chives and Black Olives into small pieces. Set Aside.
  5. When Ground Turkey is cooked thoroughly, move it, the peppers and spices to medium-sized crock pot, turned on high.
  6. Add diced Cilantro, diced Chives, diced Black Olives, Diced Tomatoes and Shredded Cheese to crock pot.
  7. Mix thoroughly and cover crock pot.
  8. Stir sporadically for the next hour and then turn crock pot to low.
  9. Drain any excess oil.
  10. Serve with tortilla chip, corn tortilla shells and/or taco shells.
  11. Continue to stir sporadically throughout the party and after 3-4 hours (or when its gone), turn crock pot off.

Notes:

  • For a spicier mix, add more Cayenne Pepper or add Diced Jalapenos, Diced Banana Peppers, Diced Green Chilis or Crushed Red Pepper.
  • Garlic Infused Olive Oil is a great addition because it adds the garlic flavor without adding the Fructans.
  • I ate mine sprinkled over tortilla chips (like nachos). Yum!

Like this recipe? Let me know what you think and explore more low FODMAP recipes.

Low FODMAP Foods to Enjoy

I have a love/hate relationship with food. I love to eat it, but my body hates me later for it. It took me a long time to figure out what foods cause my IBS symptoms to flare up and what I can eat happily with no pain later. But luckily with the low FODMAP diet, it made things a little more clear on certain foods and why they impact me in a negative way.

Not everyone is going to react to foods in the same way, so please use the high FODMAP food list and the low FODMAP food list as you see fit. For your convenience, I have listed them below and provided a printer friendly version. This low FODMAP food list was updated in April 2014.

Low FODMAP Food List:

Low FODMAP Foods to Enjoy

Fruit

  • Banana (not Ripe)
  • Blueberry
  • Cantaloupe
  • Coconut
  • Clementine
  • Cranberry
  • Cranberry Juice
  • Dragonfruit
  • Durian
  • Grape
  • Grapefruit*
  • Honeydew
  • Kiwifruit
  • Lemon
  • Lime
  • Mandarin
  • Orange
  • Passion Fruit
  • Pawpaw
  • Pineapple
  • Pomegranate
  • Raspberry
  • Rhubarb
  • Rockmelon
  • Star Anise
  • Strawberry
  • Tangelo

Vegetables

  • Alfalfa
  • Arugula
  • Bamboo Shoots
  • Bean Sprouts
  • Beets*
  • Bell Peppers
  • Bok Choy
  • Butternut Squash*
  • Carrot
  • Chives
  • Choko
  • Choy Sum
  • Corn*
  • Courgette
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant
  • Endive
  • Ginger
  • Green Beans
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Okra
  • Olives
  • Parsnip
  • Potato
  • Radish
  • Red Chili
  • Silver Beet
  • Spinach
  • Spring Onion (Green Part Only)
  • Squash
  • Swede
  • Sweet Corn*
  • Sweet Potato*
  • Taro
  • Tomato
  • Turnip
  • Water Chestnuts
  • Yam
  • Zucchini

Milk

  • Coconut Milk
  • Lactose Free Milk
  • Rice Milk

Cheese

  • Brie
  • Camembert
  • Cheddar
  • Feta
  • Mozzarella
  • Parmesan
  • Swiss
  • Hard Cheeses

Yogurt

  • Lactose Free Yogurt

Grains

  • Arrowroot
  • Gluten Free Oats
  • Gluten Free Pasta
  • Millet
  • Polenta
  • Psyllium
  • Quinoa
  • Rice
  • Rice Bran
  • Sorgum
  • Tapioca

Protein

  • Chicken
  • Beef
  • Eggs
  • Fish
  • Lamb
  • Pork
  • Tofu

Nuts/Seeds

  • Chia Seeds*
  • Flax Seeds*
  • Hazelnuts*
  • Macadamia Nuts*
  • Peanuts*
  • Pecans*
  • Pine Nuts*
  • Pumpkin Seeds*
  • Sesame Seeds*
  • Sunflower Seeds*
  • Walnuts*

Sweeteners

  • Aspartame*
  • Glucose
  • Maple Syrup
  • Splenda*
  • Sucrose
  • Sugar
  • Treacle
  • Truvia

Alcohol

  • Beer
  • Gin
  • Vodka
  • Whisky
  • Wine: Red, White, Sparkling & Sweet

*Use in limited quantities.

For your convenience, here is a Printer Friendly Low FODMAP Food List (April 2014). I have also provided the following:

It’s extremely important to review the ingredients on any packaged foods prior to purchasing food. For example, while tomatoes are deemed safe, every tomato sauce on the market contains onions or garlic as an additive and many dressings, sauces, marinades, etc. are the same way. Also, manufacturers are always modifying their ingredients, so it’s important to review labels every time you purchase something.

If you’re looking for some quick items to buy and eat right away, please reference the Low FODMAP Brand Name Packaged Foods I have compiled. It’s ideal for the lazy in all of us! Also, I have provided my favorite low FODMAP items, which mirrors my weekly grocery list and tips on how to get flavor in your food, without the FODMAPs.

Please let me know if you think I may have missed anything on this list. Happy eating!

FODMAP Food List

The low FODMAP diet really helped ease my IBS symptoms of pain, bloating, gas and the occasional bout of diarrhea. The low FODMAP diet is designed to eliminate key IBS symptom triggers for a few weeks and slowly introduce them back into your diet to better understand what your body can handle and what you should continue to avoid.

When looking over the list of foods, it is initially very scary to see all the things that should be eliminated out of your diet. Many of the items are ingredients in commonly used products, such as salad dressings, pasta sauces and marinades, so it’s very important to read through all the ingredients when purchasing a product.

It’s also essential to know that new items are constantly being tested for FODMAPs, so the list is always changing as more is discovered. Beware of out-dated FODMAP lists that seem to be everywhere online. This high FODMAP list is based on all testing directly from Monash University and was updated in April 2014.

Below are the high FODMAP foods that should be avoided when on the diet. For your convenience, I have listed them below and provided printer friendly versions.

High FODMAP Food List (by Food Group):

High FODMAP Foods to Avoid by Food Group

Fruit

  • Apple
  • Apricot
  • Avocado
  • Banana (Ripe)
  • Blackberry
  • Boysenberry
  • Cherry
  • Dates
  • Longon
  • Lychee
  • Mango
  • Nashi
  • Nectarine
  • Peach
  • Pear
  • Persimmon
  • Plum
  • Prune
  • Tamarillo
  • Watermelon
  • Concentrated Fruit Sources
  • Dried Fruit
  • Fruit Juice
  • Tinned Fruit in Natural Juice

Vegetables

  • Artichoke
  • Asparagus
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Fennel
  • Garlic
  • Leek
  • Mushrooms
  • Onion (All)
  • Peas
  • Pumpkin
  • Shallots
  • Spring Onion (White Part)
  • Snow Peas
  • Sugar Snap Peas
  • Sweet Corn

Dairy

  • Buttermilk
  • Cottage Cheese
  • Cow Milk
  • Cream
  • Cream Cheese
  • Custard
  • Evaporated Milk
  • Frozen Yogurt
  • Goat Milk
  • Ice Cream
  • Lactose
  • Margarine
  • Ricotta Cheese
  • Sheep Milk
  • Sherbet
  • Soft Unripe Cheese
  • Sour Cream
  • Sweetened Condensed Milk
  • Yogurt

Legumes

  • Baked Beans
  • Chickpeas
  • Kidney Beans
  • Lentils
  • Soy Beans

Grains

  • Rye
  • Spelt
  • Wheat

Nuts & Seeds

  • Almonds
  • Cashews
  • Pistachios

Sweeteners

  • Fructose
  • High Fructose Corn Syrup
  • Fruisana
  • Honey
  • Isomalt
  • Maltitol
  • Mannitol
  • Molasses
  • Sorbitol
  • Xylitol

Misc

  • Camomile Tea
  • Chicory
  • Cocoa Powder
  • Dandelion
  • Fennel Tea
  • Instant Coffee
  • Inulin

Alcohol

  • Rum
  • Low Glycemic Index Wine
  • Sticky Wine

For your convenience, here is a Printer Friendly High FODMAP Food List (April 2014). I have also provided the following:

Like I said, it’s overwhelming to read through that list and see some of your favorite foods on the list. For me, I am not a great chef, so the realization that I would have to make all my own sauces, dressings, dips, etc. was a lot to handle.

So… what can you eat? I’ve also outlined a helpful list of low FODMAP foods that are deemed safe, as well as a Sample Meal Plan and Brand Name Packaged Foods to eat. Also, I have provided my favorite low FODMAP items, which mirrors my weekly grocery list.

About the Low FODMAP Diet

After years of pain, gas and bloating, I found much relief after trying the low FODMAP diet. The low FODMAP diet is designed to eliminate key IBS symptom triggers for a few weeks and slowly introduce them back into your diet to better understand what your body can handle and what you should continue to avoid.

So, what is the low FODMAP diet? For starters, a group of scientists at Monash University (in Australia) have identified that short-chain carbohydrates, may be poorly absorbed by the small intestine, which causes IBS symptoms. These carbohydrates were given the acronym FODMAPs and refer to Fermentable Oligo-, Di- and Mono-saccharides, and Polyols. Not all carbohydrates are considered FODMAPs, so don’t worry about giving everything up just yet.

About the Low FODMAP Diet

The FODMAPs in the diet are:

  • Fructose is a carbohydrate found in many fruits, honey, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and agave syrup. Fructose malabsorption is not completely digested due to the lack of an enzyme, but the absorption of fructose is dependent on another carbohydrate, which is glucose. Therefore, foods with a 1:1 ratio of fructose to glucose are generally well tolerated on the low FODMAP diet. However, foods with excess fructose compared with glucose, such as apples, pears, and mangos, will likely trigger IBS symptoms.
  • Lactose is the carbohydrate found in cow, sheep, and goat milk. Lactose intolerance is caused by partial or complete lack of the enzyme lactase which digests lactose. When lactose is not completely digested, it contributes to abdominal bloating, pain, gas and diarrhea, usually occurring 30 minutes to two hours following the consumption of milk products.Foods high in lactose include milk, ice cream, yogurt and cottage cheese.
  • Fructans are carbohydrates that are completely malabsorbed because the intestine lacks an enzyme to break their fructose bond. For this reason, fructans can contribute to bloating, gas and abdominal pain. Wheat accounts for the majority of people’s fructan intake, however it also occurs in onion, garlic and many other vegetables.
  • Galactans are carbohydrates are malabsorbed for the same reason as fructans, which is that the intestine does not have the enzyme needed to break them down. Consequently, galactans can contribute to gas, bloating and abdominal pain. Beans and lentils are the primary galactans.
  • Polyols are also known as sugar alcohols. They are found naturally in some fruits and vegetables and a added as artificial sweeteners to sugar-free gum, mints and cough drops. Sugar alcohols have varying effects on the bowel. It is wise to limit your artificial sweeteners that end in -ol, such as sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol and maltitol. Splenda and aspartame are deemed safe on this diet, but many people experience bowel issues with these sweeteners, as well.

It should be noted that the low FODMAP diet is it not only what you eat, but in what quantities. Many people with IBS cannot digest large meals due to the cramping and diarrhea it causes. Personally I can always tell when I ate too much, even with all low FODMAP foods. My system just can’t take a large quantity of food, so I eat 200-300 calorie meals about 6 times a day. Even if I dine out, I usually save half and take it home.

For your convenience, here is a complete High FODMAP food list, which outlines what foods should be eliminated on the diet. After you read that (and get freaked-out), here’s some additional information that you’ll want to read:

The way the diet was designed to work, is that you should do an elimination phase of 6-8 weeks and exclude all potentially harmful foods. After 6-8 weeks, you can slowly add one category back in at time to understand what is causing your IBS symptoms. Here’s detailed information on how to reintroduce FODMAPs back into your diet.

Great Low FODMAP Diet Resources:

the Low FODMAP Diet

I’m not going to sugar-coat it, the low FODMAP diet is difficult to incorporate into everyday life and I have had a few meltdowns to show for it. Luckily, I was already gluten and lactose free at the point I started it, but it was still very difficult for me to eliminate garlic and onions, which I miss everyday. However, I do not miss the pain that they cause me, so I can rest easy… literally.

I feel very strongly that this diet shouldn’t limit your life, it should limit your pain and discomfort to allow you to take on more adventures.